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UP COMING EVENTS

"Soy de Aqui, Soy de Alla" (I'm from here, I'm from there)
with Indiana Quadra Goldberg
Thursday, January 21, 2021
1:00pm

REGISTER HERE (Free and Open to the Public)

This presentation – “Soy de Aqui, Soy de Alla" (I'm from here, I'm from there) – will explore the recurrent themes of identity and belonging emblematic of the trailblazing generation of Latina writers who broke through in the 1980s. We will examine the ongoing history, complexity, and diversity of Latinas living in the U.S. Among this array of first generation writers – “Las Madrinas/ the Godmothers”— we will focus primarily on two influential authors: Julia Alvarez and Sandra Cisneros. Each storyteller eloquently voices the paradox of being bilingual, bicultural….and AMERICAN.

Indiana Quadra is a first generation Nicaraguan-American born and raised in San Francisco, CA. As a bilingual and bicultural Latina, she has been committed throughout her career to working with the diverse immigrant populations of San Francisco. She holds degrees from San Francisco State University and the University of San Francisco. During her 35-year career at City College of San Francisco, she began as a bilingual counselor and later became the Chair of the Career Counseling Center and a professor in the Latin American and Latino/a Studies Department. She authored and, for 21 years, taught “Latinas in the U.S./ VOCES (Voices)” that remains the singular Women’s Studies class in the LALS Department. As a child of the 60's, she continues to be an advocate for Social Justice.

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"Race Card, Rights Gone Wring, and Dress Codes - Complexities of racism"
with Richard Thompson Ford
Friday, January 22, 2021
10:00am

REGISTER HERE (Free and Open to the Public)

Richard Thompson Ford is the George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. He has practiced law with the firm of Morrison & Foerster, served as a Commissioner of the San Francisco Housing Authority and worked as a policy consultant for the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, the City and County of San Francisco, California and the County of San Mateo, California.

He writes for both scholarly and popular audiences in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the San Francisco Chronicle, The Christian Science Monitor, Esquire.com and Slate, where has been a regular contributor on legal affairs, as well in the Harvard Law Review, the Stanford Law Review and the Yale Law Journal.

He has written several books, including The Race Card: how bluffing about bias makes race relations worse which The New York Times Sunday Book Review selected as one of the 100 Notable Books of 2008 and Rights Gone Wrong: how law corrupts the struggle for equality, which The New York Times selected as one of the 100 Notable Books of 2011. In 2012 ON BEING A BLACK LAWYER selected him as one of the 100 Most Influential Black Lawyers.  His latest book, Dress Codes: how the laws of fashion made history, will be published in February 2021.

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REGISTER HERE (Free and Open to the Public)
More info click here.

The Beautiful and – the Damned? Managing Art's Racial Legacies 
with Letha Ch’ien

Wednesday, January 27, 2021
10:00am

REGISTER HERE (Free and Open to the Public)

Museums contain treasures of human heritage, but many of our masterpieces carry with them problematic racial legacies. Traditional presentations have sidestepped engagement with racial content and unwittingly promulgated racist systems of knowledge. How to research, present, frame, and contextualize this art has been a matter of increasing debate in recent years. Can the racist content be ignored in favor of stylistic discussion? What are the consequences if we carry on as before? Surely tossing artwork isn't desirable nor is shuttering museum doors. While the scope of the problem remains vast, there is hope. An honest reckoning coupled with responsible curating and viewership can lead to a fuller understanding of our collective artistic inheritance and into a clearer future.

Letha Ch'ien specializes in issues of identity, ethnicity, and race in late medieval and early modern Venice. She earned her Ph.D at UC Berkeley and taught at UC Davis before assuming her current position as  assistant professor of art history at Sonoma State University. She has been a Fulbright Fellow, a Gladys Krieble Delmas Fellow, a Townsend Center for the Humanities Fellow, and is currently a fellow at the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Her recent publication, "Polytopos: Multi-ethnic Practice in Venetian Imagery" in Cultures and Practices of Coexistence in the Multi-ethnic Cities of the Mediterranean World, 13th - 18th uncovers pictorial strategies managing multi-ethnic orders and hierarchies.

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"The Other Slavery"
with Andrés Resendez
Friday, Feb 19, 10am 

REGISTER HERE (Free and Open to the Public)


Andrés Reséndez is a professor of history and author.  His specialties are early European exploration and colonization of the Americas, the U.S-Mexico border region, and the early history of the Pacific Ocean.  His latest book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016), was a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award and winner of the 2017 Bancroft Prize from Columbia University.  He teaches courses on food and history, Latin America, and Mexico.  His next book, Conquering the Pacific: An Unknown Mariner and the Final Great Voyage of the Age of Discovery, is about the tumultuous expedition that first went from America to Asia and back, thus transforming the Pacific Ocean into a vital space of contact and exchange in 1565.  It is forthcoming in September 2021.